5 Steps to Internet (and IRL) Safety and Privacy for Writers

There are many ways to think about internet safety, but with the fall publishing season book launches coming up I wanted to take the time to share my thoughts about staying safe when you’re used to interacting on the web. I consider safety physical or intellectual.

I definitely think everyone clearly knows how dangerous the web can be, but sometimes we all think we’re immune to it and take risks when we don’t know we’re doing so. It’s the thing that happens to *someone else* not us.

5 Steps to Internet (and IRL) Safety and Privacy for Writers:

Tweet or post when you’re leaving somewhere, not when you’re getting there. DM the people you’re meeting up with at the book launch instead of broadcasting it to the world. Instead of tweeting on the way to an event, why not tweet after you’ve gathered your thoughts and maybe taken a picture or two? If you are going to post in real time, don’t take pictures from the same location all night. It seems silly, but if you’re prone to over-sharing make sure you’re keeping people on their toes.

Think twice about geo-tagging. (This is when your location is attached to your social media post.) Especially if you pair it with photos. It’s easy for anyone to connect the dots if you’re posting every day or multiple times per day. When in doubt (like me), follow tip 1: geo-tag after you’ve left. I don’t need to recount all the horror stories about geo-tagging for you to get my point. Don’t forsake safety for social currency.

Check your settings. Do you know your privacy settings on all your devices? Believe it or not uploading from your phone vs. uploading on your computer require different privacy settings on Facebook. Knowledge is power. Don’t regret things later; get ahead of your privacy issues and learn where you might have cracks.

Keep your book ideas close to your chest. One of writers’ big worry is that someone will steal their idea. Journalists know to keep their stories to themselves, so writers need to think carefully about this too. If you’re doing book research keep it to private messages and open ended social media questions. I’m not saying people will steal anything, but why give yourself the opportunity to worry? Share your ideas with people you trust: writing circles, agents, and editors. Ideas also change; slow down on blogging through the details of your latest book. Give yourself freedom to make changes and add a little bit of mystery.

Remember: the trolls only win if you feed them. The internet breeds animosity. There are many opinions out there, some of which it’s hard to agree with. It’s tempting to fight back at the trolls, but all it will do is make you mad. It’s hard to change anyone’s mind, especially when you add in limited characters and a social platform. Internet fights can follow you around for a long time. Not all of us will get our Twitter spats featured in major news outlets, but blogs live on–and bloggers don’t have to fact check. It’s best to let things breeze by. No one wants to be Googled and found that their online fight has followed them around for years.

***

I love social media for the way it brings us together, but be wary about your privacy. Most book publishing people are great people! But social media is available to everyone.

Your life belongs to you, not the web. So be careful about what you decide to share. Privacy is important and you control the message. Even if you’re not thinking “privacy” at the time of posting, remember that people can connect the dots across social media platforms and days or weeks at a time. Patterns are there whether they’re intentional or not.

Lastly, if you’re into Cons, or all things amazing, grab Sam Maggs’s book FANGIRL’S GUIDE TO THE GALAXY where there is information about staying safe at big fan events.

Q: What do you think about when you’re planning your internet safety as a writer?

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17 thoughts on “5 Steps to Internet (and IRL) Safety and Privacy for Writers

  1. Not only as a writer, but in general, my considerations when it comes to safety are the following:
    – no need for location, only as you say, when I’ve been there.
    – With regards to research, libraries are great (old-school all the way) and usually I don’t trust social media for questions, I must rather contact professionals directly
    – Just upload what you want the internet world to know you from, create a persona, but never reveal your entire self.

    This was a very fun post! Informative!

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  2. I’ve been thinking a great deal lately about drastically reducing my presence on Facebook. It often feels as if the judgement I pass (albeit, to myself) regarding those who seem to constantly be working social media is an indication that they may not be that serious about their work, but more involved with creating a persona. What are the thoughts on this way of thinking?

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  3. Reblogged this on Amanda Headlee and commented:
    I’ve been a little MIA again and I am sorry for that. This summer has been interesting to say the least. This November I plan on getting back to a regular blogging (and writing) schedule, so please stay tuned.

    In the meantime, I am reblogging a post from Carly Watters. In this age where the line between reality and digital is often blurred, one has to be alert and aware when networking online. These are good tips to keep in mind for your privacy while networking with social media.

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  4. This makes a lot of sense.
    A workmate of mine just gave her uni thesis about privacy on the Internet. She said people often don’t have a clue what dangerouse things they do especially on socials (she mentioned the same as you: don’t broadcast where you’re going).

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