Manuscript Wishlist Update: Fall 2015

I haven’t updated everyone on my wishlist in awhile. There have been some recent changes. I am no longer signing up or working on children’s book projects (picture books to YA); I will be focusing my efforts on adult fiction and non fiction.

Currently Seeking:

  • Smart Book Club Fiction
  • Women’s Fiction
  • Upmarket Adult Fiction
  • Commercial Adult Fiction
  • Literary Mystery & Thrillers
  • Historical Fiction
  • Contemporary Romance
  • Pop Science and Pop Psychology
  • Cookbooks
  • Unique Memoirs
  • Lifestyle Non-Fiction: health, nutrition, relationships, parenting, lifestyle
  • Narrative Non-Fiction
  • Platform Based Non-Fiction: must have demonstrable expertise and a quantifiable market

Currently NOT Seeking:

  • Picture Books
  • Middle Grade
  • Young Adult
  • Science Fiction
  • Fantasy
  • Poetry
  • Screenplays

Some of my top recent reads:

  • The Admissions by Meg Mitchell Moore
  • The Underwriting by Michelle Miller
  • Luckiest Girl Alive by Jessica Knoll
  • The Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins
  • Everybody Rise by Stephanie Clifford
  • A Window Opens by Elisabeth Egan
  • Bennington Girls are Easy by Charlotte Silver
  • Fates and Furies by Lauren Groff
  • Friendship by Emily Gould
  • Days of Awe by Lauren Fox
  • Among the Ten Thousand Things by Julia Pierpoint
  • So You’ve Been Publicly Shamed by Jon Ronson
  • I’ll Drink To That by Betty Halbreich
  • The Long Hello by Cathie Borrie

Please send your material with my name and your book title in the subject heading to query(at)psliterary(dot)com.

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“The Call” Reversed: What agents like to know about potential authors

contract signingAuthors are usually busy studying up for “the call” (an agent reaching out via phone to offer representation) when they know it’s on the horizon. It’s an exciting time for authors and agents! Resources are everywhere and there are many great guides to “the call” including these:

However, what about the flip side? What do agents like to know about writers when we offer?

What agents like to know about potential fiction authors:

  • What are you working on next?
  • How long does it take you to write a draft?
  • Who are some of your favorite authors?
  • What kind of support are you looking for?
  • What has been your path to publishing? Agented before? Published before?
  • How do you workshop your work? Critique group?
  • Where do your ideas come from?
  • What is your day job? And what does your writing schedule look like?
  • What are some of your career goals and expectations?
  • How many other agents are looking at the manuscript?
  • Do my editorial notes match your vision for the book?
  • How do you feel about social media?

Why I want to know these things:

This is a sample of some of the questions I like to know answers to when I’m getting to know a potential author. Some of the most important things are that we share the same vision for this book and your career, and that we have similar taste in books we read for fun. I like to know that writers have a strong work ethic and a writing group they work with so I’m not the sole provider of feedback. I want to know about your publishing history even if it’s not clean and tidy–often it isn’t. I like to know your patterns like how fast you write and when you write, plus the best time to get in contact with you.

Is it about the answers?

You don’t need “perfect” answers to these questions. It’s nothing you can study for. At the end of the day we want to work with writers who we get along with, whose work we love and feel passionate about, who have a career path that we feel we can assist in, and who trust us.

That call is about both of us deciding we’re a fit. Just because you get an offer doesn’t mean you have to take it. 

Q: What have you been asked on “the call” or hope to be asked?

Further reading:

7 ways to make yourself an easy author to work with

5 Real Reasons Agents Are So Darn Picky

I think some of you swear when you say that line to yourself, but I’m keeping it PG on the blog. Really, why are we so #&$%(&-ing picky?

It’s not only the volume, but that has something to do with it.

We’re picky because we have to be. We wouldn’t be able to stay in business unless we were choosy about everything we signed up. So here’s the truth if you’re still wondering what happens at agents’ desks…

5 Reasons Agents Are Picky

1. Because editors are.

All we hear from editors is how much they have to read, how passionate they have to be in their editorial and acquisitions meetings, how much marketing and sales has a say in the books, and how they have to have a clear vision for projects they take on. So guess what, agents have adopted all those criteria too. It’s true, in this internet age the most important thing is being able to make projects stand out amongst all forms of media. So we’re looking for super special things.

2. Because the recession happened.

I wish we were still in 90s publishing when debuts got $250,000 advances. (Yes, I think we all do.) But the reason publishers don’t give out those advances anymore is because they looked at the books during the recession and thought, Hey, most of these books aren’t earning out. So why are we paying them that much? As much as I’m sad debut fiction doesn’t get that kind of up-front financial support I’m glad that publishers are thinking about royalties, authors earning out, and helping authors plan for a sustainable career–not a blockbuster model.

3. Because we care about the big picture, not the small one.

Good agents aren’t thinking next month or this year when we sign up a client. We’re thinking 5 years from now. We are thinking about all the wonderful things you’re going to do in the long run and how your career is going to grow with our support and guidance. If we thought about the short term we’d be more spontaneous and have more authors–when really it’s important for agents to dedicate our time to current authors on our roster and give them all our attention.

4. Because it’s a business.

Most agents I know are lovely, friendly, wonderful book-loving people that I enjoy spending time with always. But when it gets down to business we are tough cookies. Yes, we are creative individuals too, but when we put our agent hats on it’s all business and that means making choices that people don’t always love. Agents have made peace with that a long time ago. (You wouldn’t be able to dream up the things that get written to us in the horrible slush pile responses.) You don’t want an agent that doesn’t treat this like a business. So that’s why it’s worth the wait for the right agent. We’re picky because we invest our time. We’re not publishers so we can’t woo you with money–our time is all we have to give. And we’re serious about who we give it to.

5. Because being an agent in today’s market is demanding.

This job has never been easy. But the role of the agent has changed. We now have to be fully equipped with knowledge we never thought we’d need to have: consumer insights, meta data, marketing, publicity, social media, ebook technology and much more. If we can’t consult our clients on these things then we’re not doing our job. So it requires agents to have more industry awareness than ever before. Agents’ sole jobs used to be talent spotting and management. Now it’s managing on a more intimate level because publishers have gotten busier too.

With knowledge comes power! Some of you might know this already–but the industry changes daily–and agents have to stay on their toes!

Webinar: HOW TO GET AN AGENT May 14th, Writer’s Digest

Picture 1I’m back at Writer’s Digest doing another great webinar. This time: HOW TO GET AN AGENT. Sign up here for the May 14 (1pm EST) session. 

Many writers think getting a literary agent is the hardest thing they’ll have to do as a writer. They think agents are looking to turn away writers, when actually many agents are actively looking to sign new talent. How do you find these agents that have open doors?

Literary Agent Carly Watters works with many debut writers she’s signed from the slush pile who have become successful multi-published authors. She’ll share the industry expectations of debut writers, how to find agents that are actively looking for new writers, and what questions to ask to make sure you find the right agent for you.

Learn what agents are being told by the industry and how that shapes the debut projects they sign, why you need an agent, and where to find agents that represent what you write. Do you want know how to hook an agent? Carly will make sure you’re fishing in the right pond.

WHAT YOU’LL LEARN:

  • What an author/agent relationship looks like
  • How to find an agent that’s right for you
  • How to show agents you’re a ‘career author’
  • How to stand out among other querying writers
  • What the state of the industry looks like for new authors
  • How agents approach the slush pile and writers conferences
  • The important steps to writing a successful query letter
  • Why you must query an agent with what they ask for

WHAT’S IN IT FOR YOU:

  • Live access to the webinar to ask questions, OR if you’re working, still sign up because either way you get the webinar emailed to you and you get your critique.
  • A critique of your query! From me!
  • 1 Hour of Instruction
  • 1/2 Hour of Q & A

WHO SHOULD ATTEND?

  • Writers who are crafting their first book
  • Writers who have completed their first book
  • Published writers who do not have an agent yet
  • Writers who want to learn more about the author/agent relationship looks like
  • Writers who want to learn an agent’s role in the industry

Sign up today!