3 Differences Between a Demographic and Your Market

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I get a lot of proposals or pitches that say “there are 157 million women in the US, that’s my market” and unfortunately they’re mixing up the difference between a demographic and a market. Publishers (especially publicists) don’t take well to these things because it makes someone seem out of touch from a marketing and sales perspective which is very worrisome considering writers are doing more and more to market their own books–and publishers expect them to.

THE THREE MAIN DIFFERENCES BETWEEN A DEMOGRAPHIC AND A MARKET:

1. A Demographic is a population which generally unknowable in a marketing sense (without data), a Market is data-driven, tangible, and accountable. A Demographic is a fact and often an unattainable group. A Market is an engaged group of probable book buyers rooted in proof.

2. Do you know how to actually reach that Demographic? If so, you’re starting to get a Market.  If you don’t know how to market to these groups then they aren’t your market–you can’t reach them to share your book news.

Market:

  • Do you have a newsletter with subscribers or mailing list?
  • Do you have an engaged social media following with numbers to back it up?
  • Do you have a podcast with regular listeners?
  • Do you belong to any associations or groups (writing, alumni, or professional)?

3. Can you quantify the number of people that will directly encounter your promotion, marketing, or publicity? That’s your Market. Family, friends, co-workers, social media followers, subscribers, associations, groups–this is your market! They will be the people that you share your promotion with. Your publisher will help with bigger markets: their own mailing lists, their distribution reach, their bookstore promotion, their social media circles, existing customers and more. Your publicist will try to increase your market: getting essays, articles, reviews and interviews in front of more eyes. However, you have to do the work too–by knowing the existing market you have and how you want to grow it.

5 Year Blog-versary Round Up!

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9e4073d6863e21b9a5b923c3e62390afWow, 5 years since this blog began!

Thank you to the loyal readers and commenters for your engagement with my posts.

I decided to do a round up of some of my top posts over the years.

Craft:

30 Questions to Ask Your Main Character

When You Start Comparing Yourself To Other Writers

7 Things Writers Should Stop Wasting Their Time On

6 Tips To Hook A Reader on Page One

4 Ways To Edit Your Book Back on Track

Business:

Do You Know The Difference Between Literary, Upmarket and Commercial Fiction?

5 Secrets To Publishing Your Debut Novel

7 Ways To Make Yourself An Easy Author to Work With

Queries:

How To Write A Synopsis

8 Query Tips No One Tells Writers

How I Read Slush: 3 Lessons for Writers

Agent perspective: What’s wrong with your manuscript

Social Media:

7 Ways To Build a Platform Through Your Online Community

6 Ways Social Media Doesn’t Help You Get Published

Q: Do you have a favorite post? One that changed your opinion of the industry or changed your manuscript for the better?

4 Publishing Industry “Rules” You Can Break (and 6 You MUST follow!)

In publishing rules are just guidelines. We give you these guidelines to help you (believe it or not). We’re not trying to make your life harder; we are trying to show you how to succeed. These guidelines are what you should generally follow, but there are times you can break the rules.

A great skill for a writer to have is to know which you can bend and adapt, and which needs must be met. Read on…

4 RULES YOU CAN BREAK

  • Anything that is contradicted by multiple people at top levels – Have your go-to sources (Writer’s Digest, ME!, KidLit411, Debutante Ball, Writers in the Storm, Pub Crawl Blog, Query Shark, Jane Friedman, Girl Friday Productions, Susan Spann etc) and trust those who have years of industry experience at the top levels–we all agree on the important things. However, there will be things we don’t agree on. Therefore, trust your own gut sometimes or go with 1 trusted source (aka if you are querying a certain agent go with their guidelines, not some XYZ site that’s right 60% of the time). The most important thing is that you’re clear and concise–so if you bend the rules make sure you’re making yourself more clear, not adding complications.
  • “One Size Fits All” social media advice – If anyone is telling you there is one single way to build an author platform or brand they’re wrong. Recognizing and growing your brand will always be authentic to you. Just be yourself online, and be consistent about it. Emulate the frequency or interaction of others that you admire online, but develop your own voice. (More on platform/branding below.)
  • MFAs are the only route to getting published – You don’t need one. If you have one that’s great! But no one needs one to get published. Some people like the structure and built-in critique system. But you can recreate that outside of a school program by reading a lot and with writing groups and critique partners.
  • Marketing and publicity that began in the ice age of publishing – We are working in a very different world. The good thing about where we are right now is that writers can take chances on things! Cover reveals, price point drops, merchandise that is unique to your book. Be agile! Be forward thinking! You have full permission to question all marketing and publicity advice–but, here’s the kicker, you have to try everything and you have to throw yourself into it. You don’t get to complain that publishing is a different world and do nothing. You get to say “hey, things are different and discoverability has changed–so what am I doing as a writer to find my readership?” Finding your audience is up to YOU, not your publisher but they will help. Relying on what a publisher has done in the past shouldn’t be good enough for you, you can’t assume anything. You need a fresh plan for your book and a team that understands what your unique goals are. Everyone wants to sell books, your team will be on board for that, but it’s the ways we’re doing it that have changed.

If you understand why the rules are there, sometimes it’s okay to bend them to make a point. But you must know why the rule is there in the first place. It’s like satire. If you’re going to satirize something you have to know 1) what it is you’re playing with 2) what satire is.

6 RULES YOU MUST FOLLOW

  • Spelling and grammar – This should be easy enough in the manuscript, but sometimes writers like to get cute with puns in titles. (Please avoid! Puns in titles makes everyone question themselves and sales/booksellers think there is a typo.)
  • General length guidelines – Your adult manuscript should be between 70-90k words; if you can’t follow these rules then there’s something wrong with the structure of your book. Reasons it might be longer than 90: SF/F. However, even debut SF/F should try to be 90k because it gets really expensive to print (therefore the cost of the book goes up) and translate long works (you won’t get foreign rights deals) which makes it an uphill battle for debut authors starting a career.
  • Yes, you must get on social media – There are no excuses for a contemporary writer not to be on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram or Tumblr. Join the conversation! Learn more about the industry and your market. Unsure about social media? Read my post about building an online community and this one about recognizing your brand.
  • Communicate with your team – Rebelling against the establishment isn’t going to get your book published well. A great book might get published, but an author that’s willing to go above and beyond to promote themselves and work with their team will be a shining star. Rebelling against what your agent, editor or publicist needs from you will stop them from wanting to help you. Be a willing partner. Tell us what you’re up to and let’s work as a team.
  • If you’re writing non-fiction platform is a MUST MUST MUST – There is absolutely no way to get non-fiction published in a big way without a platform. Agents don’t look at non fiction unless it comes with a sizeable audience and a demonstrable expert. (Hint: Here’s what we want in a platform. And here are my important platform secrets that you should know from reading my blog.) Fiction authors: platform isn’t a requirement, but understanding that you’ll need to grow one eventually is helpful at early stages.
  • Submission guidelines – there is no way you’re going to get an agent’s attention by ignoring or modifying their guidelines to suit you better or try to stand out. The ones that stand out are the ones that follow the guidelines and do it well!

Yes, these rules are there for a reason…to help you get published!

Q: What other “rules” are you still confused about?

Author Brands: Which Type of Influencer Are You?

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Brand. Platform. Influencer.

Do these words scare you? If so, they shouldn’t because the fact that you’re online and interacting with this post means you understand a couple, if not all of them. Part of my brand is sharing useful information with writers, so you come here to gain knowledge from my platform.

Your personal or author brand is simply the way you conduct yourself and interact with the world. Online, your brand is everything from the color choice of your Twitter header which can evoke a certain mood, to the specific tone of articles you choose share on Facebook (uplifting? funny? motivational?). Developing a brand is just owning who you are, deciding what you want to say to the world with your work, and strategizing the best way to communicate it that reflects your brand (also known as a marketing-version of your identity). And lastly, and most important, being consistent with it.

Platform can mean two things: the type of social media site you like to use (i.e. Twitter is a platform) OR it can mean an “author platform” which is your network and ability to reach potential book buyers (i.e. 20,000 e-newsletter subscribers, a podcast, a column in a newspaper). Who knows you are? And why do they care what you have to say? Your brand is the angle and the platform is the way you share it.

Now, let’s talk influencers and check out this matrix from social media curator Klout. Look at the words across the top and the category names in the boxes. Start to think about where you fit into this.

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WHO DOES WHAT?

In this matrix, I’m a “Specialist.” I post highly focused content about a specific industry. Mike Shatzkin of The Idealog is a “Thought Leader.” Media Diversified is an “Activist.” And as you start to think about where you get your information from, and from whom, you start to see the value in being certain types of influencers.

Think of some of your favorite authors: how active are they are social media? What square do they fit into? Which authors do you admire on social media? What are they doing that you’re not?

THINKING ABOUT HIDING OUT? THINK AGAIN.

You’ll notice that there is a listening corner for “Observers” however these people are inconsistent and do more watching than interacting–many new writers sit here. However, be careful not to stay here or fall into this category when you’re leading into book promotion time. Think about getting yourself into another square. You know why it’s important. Making time for interaction and engagement shouldn’t be on the bottom of your to-do list.

HOW DO YOU PIVOT?

To move between squares, look at the side bar to see what you need to improve. “Observers” should be moving towards “Curator” or “Networker” in order to increase their following. In order to do that they need to increase their usage (get more consistent!) and increase participation (If you agree with someone, tell them! If you read an interesting article, share it with us! If you want other people to promote your book launch, try promoting other writers’ launches!).

Once you reflect on how you’re interacting with others online you can work with your strengths to increase your engagement: expanding your brand. How can you share your world-view with more people? The more people in your circles who like what you have to say means that when it comes time to publicize your book they’ll be right there with you promoting you too.

That’s why writers get themselves stuck in a corner when they blog about writing. It’s best to use social media instead of a blog if you don’t have another topic to write about. That way if you want to talk about writing you can post links instead which will give you an influencer category more in the “Sharing/Creating” spectrum like “Feeder,” “Curator,” or “Tastemaker.”

I hope this is a helpful tool to help writers move out of their comfort zones and into higher engagement. Because higher engagement means more followers and more potential for book sales! Therefore, happy agent and happy publisher.

Q: So! Have you solved the puzzle? Which type of influencer are you? …and–if you want to pivot–what square do you want to move into?