PURELY PUMPKIN: pre-order for September 6

If you’re anything like me, fall is your favorite season for a number of reasons including comfort food. And Allison Day’s PURELY PUMPKIN is coming your way Sept 6!

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Allison Day’s second cookbook is ready for pre-order and planning your big fall get togethers.

The beginning of fall brings buzz and excitement around all-things pumpkin. From the huggable lattes we eagerly await all year, to the homemade roasted pumpkin seeds whipped up after carving a jack-o-lantern on Halloween, to the first (or third) slice of pie during the holidays, there’s a place for pumpkin in everyone’s heart.

In her new cookbook, PURELY PUMPKIN, Allison Day, popular blogger and creator of the award-winning YummyBeet.com, brings the cozy warmth of pumpkin into our homes with a seasonal, whole foods recipe set and earthy food photography. With savory and sweet recipes for all meals of the day–—including a mouthwatering pumpkin dessert chapter—–it’s the cookbook your home shouldn’t be without during the fall and winter months.

Homemade pumpkin spice latte variations along with wholesome meals ideal for the everyday and the holidays are tucked into this plentiful pumpkin volume. Utilizing pumpkin flesh, pumpkin puree, pumpkin seeds, pumpkin spice, pumpkin seed oil, and heirloom pumpkins, there’s something in PURELY PUMPKIN for every craving, festivity, time constraint, and cooking level.

As enjoyable to cook from as it is to flip through curled up next to a crackling fire, there’s no better way to celebrate, share, and savor the pumpkin harvest this season.

More and more cooks are turning to their own gardens or to local farmers’ markets to find inspiration for their meals. Eating fresh, local produce is a hot trend, but lifelong Vermonter Marie Lawrence has been cooking with produce from her gardens, buying milk from the farmers up the road, and lavishing her family and lucky friends with the fruits of her kitchen labor since she was a kid. In this book she includes recipes for everything from biscuits and breads to pies and cookies, soups and stews to ribs and roasts. Also included are instructions for making cheese, curing meats, canning and preserving, and much more.

Organized by month to coordinate with a farmer’s calendar, cooks will find orange date bran muffins and old fashioned pot roast in January, hot spiced maple milk and fried cinnamon buns in March, mint mallow ice cream in July, Vermont cheddar onion bread in October, and almond baked apples with Swedish custard cream in December. Other recipes include grilled chicken with peach maple glaze, veggie tempura, raspberry chocolate chip cheesecake, and dozens of other breads, salads, drinks, and desserts that are fresh from the farmer’s kitchen.

U.S.:

AMAZON / BARNES & NOBLE 

BOOKS-A-MILLION / INDIEBOUND

POWELL’S

CANADA:

AMAZON.CA / CHAPTERS INDIGO

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Things I Wish I Knew: About Writing a Cookbook with Allison Day

Whole Bowls 9781634508551Today’s “Things I Wish I Knew” post is from cookbook author and award winning blogger Allison Day.

Allison Day is the cookbook author of Whole Bowls (Skyhorse, April 2016) and Purely Pumpkin (Skyhorse, Fall 2016), the voice and lens behind Yummy Beet, as well as a food photographer and nutritionist. Allison won gold in the 2015 Taste Canada Food Writing Awards, the highest honour for culinary writing in the country, in their inaugural blog category. Her work has appeared in the New York TimesFood Network CanadaThe Irish TimesPreventionalive, The KitchnEpicurious, the James Beard Foundation, on CityLine and more. She cooks, writes and snaps photos for Hamilton Magazine’s Good Taste column, too.

Today, Allison tells us in her own words 5 Things She Wish She Knew…About Publishing A Cookbook:

  1. Accept outside input: Taking control of every aspect of cookbook writing, from recipe research and development to testing to writing to photographing, became too much. I began to experience a bit of cabin fever over the many months of working on Whole Bowls! Writing a book, regardless of genre, can often benefit from outside input. For my second cookbook Purely Pumpkin I’ve reached out to friends for their ideas on the recipe set, even getting some assistance on the food styling front. It’s made for a much more balanced, fun job (and has helped me retain both my sanity and a social life!).
  1. Keep it quick: Writing the book over a longer period of time caused big changes in my writing, recipe and photography style. I’ve found doing a project in a more condensed time period, when I’m given far less time to second guess myself, produces a more consistent outcome.
  1. If you have a problem, ask your literary agent for help immediately: Don’t suffer in silence! If I wasn’t happy with something regarding my publisher, there are several instances I should have reached out to my literary agent (Carly) for assistance earlier. Now if there’s an issue, I tell her right away. Working through a problem with the author, publisher/editor and agent is much more efficient.
  1. Set boundaries: Because I work from home, it’s hard to separate work life and regular life, as they generally overlap when “you” are your business. I used to set unnecessary standards for getting work done, working later into the evening than I should. Today, I’m much more efficient if I stop all work by 6 or 7 pm, make dinner and unwind with a friend, walk or good tv show. I’ve also discontinued working on Saturdays when I can help it, which helps refresh my ideas for the week ahead and keeps me happy.
  1. Embrace change: Writing is dynamic. Every piece of work you do is a little snapshot of who you were at that specific moment in time. Inevitably (and thankfully!), you’ll grow as a writer, changing your style with each new project. Looking back at Whole Bowls, I can see things I’d love to change (recipes, photos, words, etc.), but I’m so proud of the book in its entirety. I don’t sit and stew over minor details anymore – it’s the big picture that matters. When you get the book in your hands, regardless of what it contains, it’s an incredible accomplishment that neither you nor anyone else should diminish. Accepting that my work will change over my career is no longer nerve-wracking to me, but exciting. And the more comfortable I become in my food, photography and writing style, the more enthusiastic the response from my blog (Yummy Beet) and cookbook audience.

Check out her books! Whole Bowls is in store tomorrow and Purely Pumpkin is available this fall.

Happy Book Birthday to THE WELLNESS KITCHEN

Happy publication day to THE WELLNESS KITCHEN!

Find it at B&N, IndieBound, and Amazon.

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From the publisher:

Forget gimmicky diets, limiting meal plans, and unsatisfying juice cleanses! The Wellness Kitchen shows you how to transform your body–and life–with wholesome, flavorful foods that can be easily incorporated into any diet. Using her experience as a nutritional expert on ABC’s hit show Extreme Makeover: Weight Loss Edition, Paulette Lambert has created more than 100 easy-to-make recipes that will help you not only improve your health, but also achieve your optimal body weight. From hearty breakfast plates to mouthwatering entrees to decadent desserts, this book offers nutritious and satisfying meals that your whole family will love, including:

  • Spiced Quinoa Breakfast Porridge
  • Roasted Butternut Squash Soup with Apples and Sage
  • Margarita Steak with Tomatillo Salsa
  • Grilled Fish Tacos with Guacamole and Cabbage Slaw
  • Orange Cardamom Cookies with Dark Chocolate Drizzle

Complete with step-by-step instructions and easy-to-find ingredients, The Wellness Kitchen will help you take those first steps toward a healthier and happier you.

Deal News: WHOLE BOWLS by Allison Day has been sold to Skyhorse Publishing

roasted garlic parsnip white bean soupGreat news cookbook fans! WHOLE BOWLS by Allison Day (blogger and food photographer at YummyBeet.com) has been sold to Skyhorse for publication in 2016.

Can’t wait?

Try some of her recipes from Yummy Beet now:

Simply Granola

Pumpkin Caramel Almond Butter Cups

Roasted Garlic, Parsnip, and White Bean Soup

And her Vegetarian Thanksgiving dish in the New York Times:

Rice, Beet, Kale Salad with Cider Dressing