Happy Book Birthday to MAYBE IN ANOTHER LIFE by Taylor Jenkins Reid

Maybe In Another Life_Final

It’s here! Congratulations to Taylor on the release of her third novel with S&S/Atria Books.

Life is long and full of an infinite number of decisions…

Featured by Cosmo, Good Housekeeping, Bustle, and USA Today.

At the age of twenty-nine, Hannah Martin still has no idea what she wants to do with her life. Shortly after moving back to her hometown of Los Angeles, she goes out to a bar with her best friend, Gabby, and reconnects with her high school boyfriend, Ethan. Just after midnight, she is offered a ride home by each of them.

What happens if she leaves with Gabby?
What happens if she leaves with Ethan?

As these two alternate realities run their course, Maybe in Another Life raises questions about fate and true love: Is anything meant to be? How much in our life is determined by chance? And perhaps, most compellingly: Is there such a thing as a soul mate?

“Entertaining and unpredictable.” -Kirkus
“A heartfelt, witty and scintillating journey from one parallel universe to another… I loved every word.” -Renee Carlino, USA Today Bestselling Author

Happy Book Birthday to FAKING PERFECT by Rebecca Phillips

 

FP2Happy Book Birthday to this beauty! FAKING PERFECT by Rebecca Phillips is let loose on the world today. Buy it at Barnes & Noble, Amazon, Chapters/Indigo or wherever you get your books.

Join us and enjoy this fun, romantic, edgy read that reviewers, authors, and bloggers have raved about.

“Fans of Sarah Dessen’s novels will enjoy this book. Phillips will soon be a must-read YA writer for those who love romance and drama.” — School Library Journal

“Completely enthralling. Rebecca Phillips’ novel is edgy and at the same time touching.” — Carolita Blythe, author of Revenge of a Not-So-Pretty Girl

“Edgy and honest, Faking Perfect is the real thing.” — Huntley Fitzpatrick, author of My Life Next Door
“Poignant, edgy, and real, Faking Perfect is an honest look at the courage and strength it can often take simply to be yourself.” — Julianna Scott, author of The Holders
**
faking perfect mechanicalWhen Lexi Shaw seduced Oakfield High’s resident bad boy Tyler Flynn at the beginning of senior year, he seemed perfectly okay with her rules:
1. Avoid her at school.
2. Keep his mouth shut about what they do together.
3. Never tease her about her friend (and unrequited crush) Ben.
Because with his integrity and values and golden boy looks, Ben can never find out about what she’s been doing behind closed doors with Tyler. Or that her mom’s too busy drinking and chasing losers to pay the bills. Or that Lexi’s dad hasn’t been a part of her life for the last thirteen years. But with Tyler suddenly breaking the rules, Ben asking her out, and her dad back in the picture, how long will she be able to go on faking perfect?

**

Find it at Barnes & Noble, Amazon, Chapters/Indigo or wherever you get your books.

 

4 Reasons You Should be Taking Risks with your Fiction

Playing it safe gets boring. Writers who take chances end up pushing the boundaries and get conversations going. And when conversations get started publicity will take off.

  • Station Eleven
  • Age of Miracles
  • The Golem and the Jinni

What do these books have in common? They defy category. They took risks and they paid off. They step outside our known boundaries, but stick to universal human emotion–that’s how we relate to their worlds.

4 Reasons You Should be Taking Risks with your Fiction:

1. Memorable is better than derivative. Nothing will make people remember like something they’ve never read before. Agents included. We are always looking for things that we can’t forget. When we say “we’ll know it when we see it” this is what we’re getting at. If we can’t forget it means that when we send something to an editor that they won’t be able to get it out of their heads either–and so on. Derivative books have a place, they fit neatly into genre boxes which can be helpful, but don’t be too scared to take a chance and see where your imagination goes.

2. Blending genres and categories is what creates unique books. Not only are risky books memorable, they’re also unique. That means that when sales staff are pitching to booksellers or publicity are pitching to magazines they will know how this book is different than all the rest. Don’t be afraid of mixing up genres and keeping readers on their toes. Lots of agents I know are looking for “genre bending.” It’s on our hotlist. (Read more about genre-bending books here.)

3. You won’t get better unless you push yourself and let go of expectation. If you try to write into neat boxes you are closing yourself down before you even try something new. It’s scary to sit down at your desk and not know if that writing time is going to take you anywhere. It could be a “waste” of 2 hours. But the secret is that all writing time is productive. It gets you closer either way–whether you use it or not. The first step is getting ideas on the page, you can edit the rest later.

4. Even if you take us into new fantasy, alternate historical, or sci fi worlds you can still ground it with relatable themes and human connections. As I mentioned in the opening, a lot of the recent successes in alternate worlds revolve around the idea that we are all still human and have universal emotions: the outsider, coming of age, survival etc. If you can tap into those human emotions you can still take us on a roller coaster plot into outer space. If we can relate to the character’s stakes and struggle than the rest is up to your imagination and ability to create believability.

Q: What are your favorite genre-bending or uniquely memorable books?

What happens if your book gets cancelled or series doesn’t continue to get published?

contract signingThere are many reasons to have an agent in your corner, but the dreaded book cancellation–or having the plug pulled on your series–is a big one. Your agent will be your shoulder to cry on and help you with next steps.

Unfortunately, it happens and it’s not fun for anyone. This is not legal advice, but some experiences that you might have heard about.

Here are a few scenarios: 

1. Your book gets cancelled before you sign your contract. This is heartbreaking, especially for debut authors. You’re so thrilled to have a book deal. Your agent negotiated the terms and accepted the offer. Next is the contract. However, sometimes things happen in this stage that stop it in its tracks (the publisher gets bought, the editors leaves, the publisher shutters an imprint, you can’t agree on terms etc). This is why agents usually like to wait until publishing contracts are signed to announce deals: to prevent this heartbreak from being too public in case we need to shop it again. But yes, we can shop it around again. Until the contract is signed, it’s nearly impossible to keep anyone accountable without suing them and even then you might not win if you don’t have a paper trail. So instead of taking legal action we dust ourselves off and continue to seek out a new home. You want a book deal because a publisher is crazy about your book (and will promote it with excitement), not because they have to.

2. Your book gets cancelled after you sign your contract. This can be a breach of contract if done without reason, but also could be that someone didn’t hold up their end of the bargain. Did you deliver late? If so, you’re the one holding things up, but because publishing is an art not a science editors are usually okay with this sort of thing (for a few weeks, not a few years!). Being honest is always the best policy. Did you deliver really, really late? Then publishers are less forgiving. If you deliver a year late and it’s not quite the book the publisher hoped it would be (more the case with non fiction) then the project can be cancelled. (I won’t get into the scenario if someone cancels a book without reason. That’s another publishing law issue. Follow Susan Spann on Twitter for more copyright law.)

3. Your series stops after a few books and you hadn’t wrapped it up yet. This scenario is hard to attribute to anything other than low sales or a publisher closing its doors. One is somewhat in your control and the other isn’t at all. Publishers will offer a multi-book deal for a series, but that could be 2 books or 10 books and they’re only required to publish those under contract. If your books didn’t find their audience it’s hard for a publisher to continue to invest in your storyline. It’s purely a business decision and not personal. They signed it up originally because they loved it. If so, you can shop around the rest of your series (which can be hard because the new publisher can’t cross promote easily and it’s hard to find a new audience for something they can’t rebrand) or self publish it.

Publishing is time-intensive endeavour and careers are long. The best thing to do is get sad and get mad (to your agent only) and then learn from the experience and start on your next project. Everyone is trying to make the best business decisions they can–even if they’re not the ones you want to hear.

Feel free to share experiences or concerns in the comments below.

Click here for more on US copyright law. And remember each country has their own rules.