A Detailed, Bookish Guide to Instagram

I’ve rounded up some bookish Instagram experts, compiled data, and pulled links together to show everyone a complete picture of Instagram for writers and book lovers. If you’re unsure about whether Instagram is for you try it out and you’ll quickly see why book lovers flock there. Book covers are made to be captured and shared on the platform. Writers can share their WIP adventures or road to publication. Publishers host giveaways.

Plus, many book bloggers now use Instagram to promote their book coverage on their blogs. So not only should writers be on there to build a personal platform, writers should also be on there building a community to help promote their book when the time comes. Below are some tips from book bloggers and “bookstagrammers” that will help explain these concepts.

And, you can follow me on Instagram to get a taste of a visual bookish life: @carlywatters. I try to show what I’m reading for fun with my #cwreads hashtag, promote my clients’ books, and share my personal and professional travels.

How To Grow Your Platform: INTERACT!

Sassy & Dangerous Bookstagrammer Talina says: “If you are looking to build your platform and have your voice heard in the book world then I can’t stress this enough: you need to interact and connect. Don’t be shy in reaching out to fellow authors, readers, bookstagrammers/bloggers. With the new algorithm that Instagram has adopted, it’s harder for smaller accounts to get noticed, unfortunately. So, take matters into your own hands – reach out to others, promote yourself in creative ways, and let your voice be heard in this book world.” (Editor’s note: here’s a blog post with some algorithm-beating tips!)

How To Create a Brand: TRY TO TAKE VISUALLY PLEASING SHOTS!

Swept Away By Books Bookstagrammer Alyssa says: “Some people complain about not having enough, or ‘good’ props for photos, but that’s where spontaneity and creativity come into play.  Take a photo in the location that you’re reading, nestle your book in with your blanket and cup of tea on the couch, show a bit of your every day life in your photo to create a sense of reality; but always ensure it’s pleasing to the eye. Not only will that actually make a user stop and take a closer look, but it will make the chance that they engage on your photo with a like and comment more likely.”

I also recommend using natural light as much as possible! Artificial light can look too warm no matter what filter you use.

What Filter Should I Use? THE SAME ONE ON EVERY PHOTO.

The easiest way to build a visual brand on Instagram is to use the same filter on every image you post. Even if it’s not the best filter for that image you’ll quickly create brand recognition and continuity with the same “look” across the board.

What Is Your Brand? YOURSELF!

Talina sums this up so well: “We all have people or things we look up to. We find inspiration in that person or their work(s), or maybe it’s something else that you find your inspiration in. But at the end of the day the most important thing to remember is to be yourself. If you are passionate with what you do, people will notice it and they will remember that. Bookstagram is probably one of the best places that you can go on and share your love for literature. It’s where you can connect with others that love the same things you do: books. So my advice to you would be to be yourself, be authentic, be passionate and I promise everyone will notice and remember you for that.”

How Do You Build A Community? AUTHENTICITY

Book Baristas creator Natasha (with 114k followers!) told me in an earlier blog post: “Be authentic – your personality and style will make your platforms sing. I can’t stress enough how important it is to be original with your words and ideas. Know your audience – every platform will attract different types of readers. Be honest with your content – if you are passionate about your work, it will show and people are more likely to appreciate your honesty! Lastly, remember that if reading and sharing your love of reading with others is something that you adore doing, then you are in the right place! Books are what bind us together in this community – don’t forget that we are all just readers finding our place in this online bookish world.”

How Often Should You Post? MULTIPLE TIMES A WEEK!

I love this advice from Alyssa and I’m trying to incorporate it more into my feed: “You’ll never build an audience by posting one or two times a week. I’m not saying you have to post daily, but make it an effort to post frequently. Over posting can become annoying (2 posts a day max). This goes back to interacting with fellow Instagram users- if they have nothing new to interact with you over, how will they keep coming back?

Also, according to Simply Measured, Friday afternoons garner the most comments (meaning the most engagement) specifically from 3-4pm. Other great time are weekday commuting hours (8-10am and 4-6pm), weekday evenings as people scroll before bed (9-11pm), and weekend mornings before people start their days (9-11am).

How Writers Should Engage with Book Bloggers who Bookstagram: PATIENCE!

Natasha also said: “Remember that these bloggers/reviewers are going to be busy reading/reviewing a ton of other books and to be patient with the time that it can take for a review/Instagram feature to go up. Personally, I feel a sense of urgency when a writer will ask me when exactly I plan to put up a review. Blogging can feel insanely overwhelming so I’d just be more aware of that. Also, be prepared for whatever review/rating you get – sometimes a story doesn’t resonate with a reader and that’s okay.”

What Are Instagram Stories? A MORE USER FRIENDLY VERSION OF SNAPCHAT

Instagram stories are like Snapchat (linked photos or video clips that last for 24 hours on the platform) but I find it easier to use than Snapchat. For example, you can use the photos you’ve taken with your camera app (with Snapchat you have to use the camera in the app) from the past 24 hours and open those photos to use in your Instagram Story. For more tips, read this article in The Social Media Examiner and see this Neiman Lab post about visual storytelling.

What Hashtags Should You Use? THESE ONES:

  • #MondayMotivation
  • #WriterWednesday
  • #ThrowbackThursday
  • #FridayReads
  • #Bookstagram
  • #Bookgram
  • #Booklover
  • #Bookworm
  • #Booknerd
  • #VSCObooks
  • #Instareads
  • And don’t forget the hashtags of writers you’re reading, publishers, book titles and locations you’re reading in.

 

***

So, go ahead and get started! Be playful and share that bookish life of yours.

In the comments include your Instagram handle so my blog followers can find and follow each other–start building your platform today.

Advertisements

Things I Wish I Knew: Book Baristas Tips for Social Media

Screen Shot 2016-02-28 at 11.22.30 AMIf you don’t know about Book Baristas you’re probably not on Instagram. Book Baristas, at the time of writing, has approximately 80,000 Instagram followers and is certainly one of the most followed and respected “bookstagramers” around. If you’re on Instagram be sure to follow her! If you’re on the fence about the power of Instagram for books I think she’ll convince you it’s necessary.

She recently took a job working in publishing and has moved to NYC. She continues to blog and bookstagram while working for Penguin Books. Her name is Natasha Minoso and she’s our next “Things I Wish I Knew” series interviewee. I was thrilled to direct her some questions I know writers ask a lot: how do I grow my online platform and how do I work with book bloggers? Read on for the answers…

Book Baristas is a major book recommendation source on Instagram! Congratulations on building that platform. What do you wish you knew when you started it? 

Thank you! I wish I would have known that it would be both extremely time consuming and addictive. It’s a lot of work to keep up an Instagram, but its 100% worth it to be able to connect with readers/authors/publishers all over the world on one platform.

When you started Book Baristas did you strategically plan for it to grow on Instagram (as opposed to Twitter) or was that a natural place for the platform to develop? How fast did it grow?

I definitely didn’t plan for it to become as big as it is – creating an Instagram for the blog was just another outlet I could use to drive traffic to my blog’s website. It became apparent that Instagram was going to play a bigger role in this whole blogging world I was suddenly a part of. I’d say it started growing a lot faster after one of my first-ever Instagram giveaways (#BookBaristas5k) in February of 2015 that ended up being a crazy successful giveaway. Since then, it’s been kind of a whirlwind!

What advice can you give to writers about working with book bloggers or Instagram reviewers?

I’d say to remember that these bloggers/reviewers are going to be busy reading/reviewing a ton of other books and to be patient with the time that it can take for a review/Instagram feature to go up. Personally, I feel a sense of urgency when a writer will ask me when exactly I plan to put up a review. Blogging can feel insanely overwhelming so I’d just be more aware of that. Also, be prepared for whatever review/rating you get – sometimes a story doesn’t resonate with a reader and that’s okay.  

What advice do you have for writers or bloggers trying to grow their platforms? 

Be authentic – your personality and style will make your platforms sing. I can’t stress enough how important it is to be original with your words and ideas. Know your audience – every platform will attract different types of readers. Be honest with your content – if you are passionate about your work, it will show and people are more likely to appreciate your honesty! Lastly, remember that if reading and sharing your love of reading with others is something that you adore doing, then you are in the right place! Books are what bind us together in this community – don’t forget that we are all just readers finding our place in this online bookish world.

For more, follow Book Baristas on Twitter, Instagram and the blog, or follow Natasha’s personal account on Twitter.

5 Steps to Internet (and IRL) Safety and Privacy for Writers

There are many ways to think about internet safety, but with the fall publishing season book launches coming up I wanted to take the time to share my thoughts about staying safe when you’re used to interacting on the web. I consider safety physical or intellectual.

I definitely think everyone clearly knows how dangerous the web can be, but sometimes we all think we’re immune to it and take risks when we don’t know we’re doing so. It’s the thing that happens to *someone else* not us.

5 Steps to Internet (and IRL) Safety and Privacy for Writers:

Tweet or post when you’re leaving somewhere, not when you’re getting there. DM the people you’re meeting up with at the book launch instead of broadcasting it to the world. Instead of tweeting on the way to an event, why not tweet after you’ve gathered your thoughts and maybe taken a picture or two? If you are going to post in real time, don’t take pictures from the same location all night. It seems silly, but if you’re prone to over-sharing make sure you’re keeping people on their toes.

Think twice about geo-tagging. (This is when your location is attached to your social media post.) Especially if you pair it with photos. It’s easy for anyone to connect the dots if you’re posting every day or multiple times per day. When in doubt (like me), follow tip 1: geo-tag after you’ve left. I don’t need to recount all the horror stories about geo-tagging for you to get my point. Don’t forsake safety for social currency.

Check your settings. Do you know your privacy settings on all your devices? Believe it or not uploading from your phone vs. uploading on your computer require different privacy settings on Facebook. Knowledge is power. Don’t regret things later; get ahead of your privacy issues and learn where you might have cracks.

Keep your book ideas close to your chest. One of writers’ big worry is that someone will steal their idea. Journalists know to keep their stories to themselves, so writers need to think carefully about this too. If you’re doing book research keep it to private messages and open ended social media questions. I’m not saying people will steal anything, but why give yourself the opportunity to worry? Share your ideas with people you trust: writing circles, agents, and editors. Ideas also change; slow down on blogging through the details of your latest book. Give yourself freedom to make changes and add a little bit of mystery.

Remember: the trolls only win if you feed them. The internet breeds animosity. There are many opinions out there, some of which it’s hard to agree with. It’s tempting to fight back at the trolls, but all it will do is make you mad. It’s hard to change anyone’s mind, especially when you add in limited characters and a social platform. Internet fights can follow you around for a long time. Not all of us will get our Twitter spats featured in major news outlets, but blogs live on–and bloggers don’t have to fact check. It’s best to let things breeze by. No one wants to be Googled and found that their online fight has followed them around for years.

***

I love social media for the way it brings us together, but be wary about your privacy. Most book publishing people are great people! But social media is available to everyone.

Your life belongs to you, not the web. So be careful about what you decide to share. Privacy is important and you control the message. Even if you’re not thinking “privacy” at the time of posting, remember that people can connect the dots across social media platforms and days or weeks at a time. Patterns are there whether they’re intentional or not.

Lastly, if you’re into Cons, or all things amazing, grab Sam Maggs’s book FANGIRL’S GUIDE TO THE GALAXY where there is information about staying safe at big fan events.

Q: What do you think about when you’re planning your internet safety as a writer?