What is New Adult Fiction?

bwbooks2I still get asked about New Adult on a regular basis. So here’s my notes about what it is:

  • New Adult is about characters from age 18-25 engaging in the next step of their lives
  • It’s about many firsts (like romance and going out into the world to live alone)
  • It’s intense, 1st person writing, dramatic fiction and very fun.
  • It’s about high intensity, lots of stakes, a passionate journey, and strong desires.
  • New Adult readers are an engaged readership. They are loyal readers and fans.
  • New Adult readers should go to their bookshops and tell booksellers what they want to see in stores. Booksellers need to know what readers want.
  • New Adult editions are original trade paper. Editors are looking for authors that can write and produce fast, good work. Continue reading What is New Adult Fiction?
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What I’m Looking for Fall ’13 Edition

I post what I’m looking for in submissions on my blog and in every interview I give, but I thought I’d take some time today to elaborate on what gets my heart rate accelerating, and things I’m especially looking for in my inbox this fall.

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1. Upmarket Women’s Fiction

Also called ‘Book Club Books’ women’s fiction is about the space between literary and commercial. It needs to be both character and plot driven, pull at some heart strings, and be about more than romance (but I, of course, want some romance and troubled love stories in there!). I’m open to anything with a suspenseful or thriller twist, historical setting, and–as well as straight contemporary.

Examples: Jennifer Close, Meg Mitchell Moore, Sarah Jio, Nichole Bernier, Allison Winn Scotch, Beth Hoffman, Curtis Sittenfeld, Karen White, Susana Daniel, Mary Alice Monroe, Jojo Moyes, and my wonderful client Taylor Jenkins Reid

fromashes2. High Stakes YA or Original New Adult

I like high stakes romance and drama. Whether it’s a thriller or romance, what the characters stand to lose is an important part of keeping me hooked. I especially like contemporary settings and issues that face today’s teen. I’m open to the New Adult age category, but most importantly the age category has to suit the story.

Examples: Hopeless (Colleen Hoover), From Ashes (Molly McAdams), Burn for Burn (Jenny Han), Pretty Little Liars (Sara Shepard), The Statistical Probability of Love at First Sight (Jennifer E. Smith), If I Stay (Gayle Forman), Eleanor and Park (Rainbow Rowell), Sarah Dessen, Jennifer Echols

powerofhabit3. Pop Science and Pop Psychology proposals

What I love about working on pop science and pop psychology is learning something new from the experts. If you are an expert and can explain a fascinating topic and new argument in a compelling and clear way, then I want to see your proposal.

Examples: The Power of Habit (Charles Duhigg), Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking (Susan Cain), Switch: How To Change When Things Are Hard (Chip Heath), Salt Sugar Fat: How the Food Giants Hooked Us (Michael Moss)

Tumbleweeds4. Multiple POV Fiction

I love books that let me get into multiple characters’ heads. I feel like this gives writers the opportunity to paint a really complex picture and intersect the drama from many different angles. And, it’s satisfying because it’s not something we’re able to do in our real lives: get into the heads of the people around you.

Examples: The Slap (Christos Tsiolkas), Nineteen Minutes (Jodi Picoult), Summerland (Elin Hilderbrand), Tumbleweeds (Leila Meacham), Beautiful Ruins (Jess Walter)

smittenkitchen5. Health and Wellness

This is a crowded market, but I’m always on the lookout for fresh angles and controversial ways to discuss health and wellness topics. This includes cookbooks, diet books, lifestyle books, memoir, relationship books, and more.

Examples: Why We Get Fat: And What to Do About It (Gary Taubes), Clean: The Revolutionary Program to Restore the Body’s Natural Ability to Heal Itself (Alejandro Junger), The Happiness Project (Gretchen Rubin), The Secrets of Happy Families  (Bruce Feiler), Grain Brain: The Surprising Truth about Wheat, Carbs, and Sugar (David Perlmutter), Sugar Nation: The Hidden Truth Behind America’s Deadliest Habit and the Simple Way to Beat It (Jeff O’Connell), Smitten Kitchen Cookbook (Deb Perelman)

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I’m an agent and a reader. Make it impossible for me to put down. If you have written anything similar to what I’ve outlined above, please send! I’m also open to being surprised. Fresh voices and concepts are what keeps the business going ’round. In general, I’m drawn to emotional, well-paced narratives, with a great voice and characters that readers can get invested in–in fiction. And in non fiction I want to learn something new and read something fresh.

Send your query to query@psliterary.com.