Writing Diversity: campaigns, resources, terms and how you can help to read between your own lines

IS09AL15JThere are so many great campaigns going around the internet about diversity in publishing and books. This is my attempt to share that wisdom and it is not an exhaustive or complete list. Diversity is a word for the growing awareness (not a trend) that all types of people should honestly and accurately be represented in literature. Learning where we’re starting from and questioning our assumptions is how we begin to grow as an industry.

Get in the know about the movements and if you’re writing fiction learn some new resources to better support your work.

Firstly, let’s get on the same page:

  • Bad representation is worse than no representation.
  • Check your privilege and your biases. Question your assumptions. Change doesn’t happen unless we ask the right questions.
  • If you’re not sure this post is for you, you’re wrong. We can all learn something. Open your mind to new ways of thinking about your work and how it reaches people.
  • Diversity is more than race. It’s socioeconomic, it’s (dis)ability, it’s religion, it’s gender, it’s sexuality, or it’s age. Most importantly, it’s about intersectional equality.

Campaigns

Resources

Terms

What can you do?

  • Share what you’ve learned with your critique partner or writing group.
  • Write real people honestly. And if you don’t know how, then do research–don’t guess or rely on secondary resources.
  • Speak up when other writers make you uncomfortable.
  • Organizing a conference, speaking event or blog tour? Think about diversity and inclusivity.
  • When in doubt, find the honesty and the truth by listening.
  • Learn how to describe characters’ physical attributes respectfully and naturally. (Try this character development master list.)
  • What you’re not saying is as important as what you do say: All white cast? Nuclear family? Stereotypes of poverty or sexuality? Are you truly representing the real world?
  • Try getting your news from diverse sources like The Root or The New Civil Rights Movement.
  • No one can change where they are from or how they were raised, but you can choose how to live your life as an educated adult.
  • I don’t believe anyone sets out to offend others. I think some writers just haven’t questioned their biases or world view. Set out to educate others with facts and resources like this. Read between your own lines.

Q: What are your favourite writing diversity resources? What did I miss? 

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