Cover Reveal: ANY OTHER GIRL by Rebecca Phillips

Did you see Rebecca Phillips reveal her cover for ANY OTHER GIRL last week?

Here’s the description:

After a disastrous, reputation-destroying party at the end of junior year, Kat Henley has a new plan. When it comes to boys—especially other people’s boys:

Don’t touch.

Don’t smile.

Don’t charm.

In the past, drawing attention to herself helped distract people from what really makes Kat different—having two gay parents. But it’s also cost her friendships. Kat can’t afford to lose any more of those, especially not her cousin, Harper. They’re spending one last summer together at the lake, where they run into an intriguing newcomer named Emmett Reese. After years of trying to prove she’s just like everybody else, Kat has found someone who wants her because she’s not. A boy who could be everything she wants too—if Harper hadn’t liked him first…


Pre-Order Here! 

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Happy Book Birthday to FAKING PERFECT by Rebecca Phillips

 

FP2Happy Book Birthday to this beauty! FAKING PERFECT by Rebecca Phillips is let loose on the world today. Buy it at Barnes & Noble, Amazon, Chapters/Indigo or wherever you get your books.

Join us and enjoy this fun, romantic, edgy read that reviewers, authors, and bloggers have raved about.

“Fans of Sarah Dessen’s novels will enjoy this book. Phillips will soon be a must-read YA writer for those who love romance and drama.” — School Library Journal

“Completely enthralling. Rebecca Phillips’ novel is edgy and at the same time touching.” — Carolita Blythe, author of Revenge of a Not-So-Pretty Girl

“Edgy and honest, Faking Perfect is the real thing.” — Huntley Fitzpatrick, author of My Life Next Door
“Poignant, edgy, and real, Faking Perfect is an honest look at the courage and strength it can often take simply to be yourself.” — Julianna Scott, author of The Holders
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faking perfect mechanicalWhen Lexi Shaw seduced Oakfield High’s resident bad boy Tyler Flynn at the beginning of senior year, he seemed perfectly okay with her rules:
1. Avoid her at school.
2. Keep his mouth shut about what they do together.
3. Never tease her about her friend (and unrequited crush) Ben.
Because with his integrity and values and golden boy looks, Ben can never find out about what she’s been doing behind closed doors with Tyler. Or that her mom’s too busy drinking and chasing losers to pay the bills. Or that Lexi’s dad hasn’t been a part of her life for the last thirteen years. But with Tyler suddenly breaking the rules, Ben asking her out, and her dad back in the picture, how long will she be able to go on faking perfect?

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Find it at Barnes & Noble, Amazon, Chapters/Indigo or wherever you get your books.

 

Selling Your Children’s Book: How to Write and Pitch Novels & Picture Books for Kids


Children’s books—young adult, middle grade, and picture books—have taken over the publishing industry (in a good way). Readers of all ages are devouring the books that used to only take up space in libraries, children’s bookshelves, or school classrooms. Now, children’s books are celebrated for their enchanting prose, their relatable characters, their beautiful illustrations, and their fantastic stories that transcend age category. The growth of the children’s book sector has been unprecedented this past decade—so how can you make your manuscript stand out in these crowded categories and genres?

In this new Writer’s Digest Boot Camp starting June 29th, 2015, the agents of P.S. Literary Agency will show you how to make your submission stand out. How do you write a children’s book with commercial appeal? How do you decide what category and genre your book belongs in? How do you find agents and publishers to submit your manuscript to? How can you attract both child and adult readers (and buyers)?

The agent instructors will answer these questions—and more! They will also critique your work and answer any questions you have about writing and selling books for children. As a registrant, you can choose to hear a tutorial on how to craft an amazing picture book, and then have your picture book critiqued—or you can choose to hear a different tutorial on writing middle grade and young adult fiction, and then have the first five pages of your YA/MG manuscript critiqued.

Sign up today!

This program will show writers of Young Adult and Middle Grade the following:

  • What the difference is between Middle Grade and Young Adult fiction
  • How to create engaging characters that agents, editors, and readers will love
  • Where (and where not) in the your story to start the manuscript
  • How to avoid the most common mistakes found in Young Adult and Middle Grade manuscripts, such as talking down to your audience
  • How to use common Middle Grade and Young Adult tropes
  • What the biggest genres are in Middle Grade and Young Adult fiction right now—and how to decide where your manuscript fits in
  • What to highlight in your pitch to sell your book to agents and publishers
  • What you can learn from your favorite Young Adult and Middle Grade novels

This program will show writers of Picture Books the following:

  • What the state of the market looks like for picture books
  • How to learn from previous bestsellers
  • How to come up with a great story that’s character- and plot-driven
  • How to create a page-turning arc that will keep kids coming back
  • Why rhythm, not rhyming, is the key to success
  • How to think visually and how to work with illustrators
  • How to avoid the “don’ts” in writing for children
  • How to inspire kids without writing heavy morals

Don’t miss out! There is limited space.

Everyone gets a free copy of my e-book GETTING PUBLISHED IN THE 21st CENTURY.

9 Unlikely Reads that Will Make Your Writing Better

There are thousands of “best books for writers” lists out there. (I’ve written one!) But what about the inspiration that comes from all around us? Not just Bird By Bird (even though everyone should have read this one by now…) but poetry, graphic novels, non fiction etc. Writers always have their eyes and ears open about ideas and jumping off points. Where do your ideas come from?

Here are 9 Unlikely Reads that Will Make Your Writing Better:

1. Tiny Beautiful Things by Cheryl Strayed

One of the most important skills a writer can have is to deeply understand the human condition. Everyone we meet in life is going through a personal struggle and so should every character. Tiny Beautiful Things is Cheryl Strayed’s book of advice from her former Dear Sugar column in The Rumpus. This book is profound in its way to relate to people and thinking about the meaning of our troubled lives.

2. Neruda

I’m a strong believer in the power of poetry. Everyone has their own go-to poet, but mine has long been Neruda. I’m a sucker for love stories and sometimes it feels like every story that can ever be told has already been written. Neruda (and many poets) have a way of distilling love and life into such simple and clear notes that it rejuvenates your inspiration and teaches us that simple stories are the most powerful.

3. This One Summer written by Mariko Tamaki, illustrated by Jillian Tamaki 

Emotions are conveyed not only in words, but often in images. This One Summer took the world by storm with its beautiful coming-of-age story set to illustrations. It won awards for its portrayal of adolescence featuring secrets, melancholy and wistfulness. When you write, images are often filling your mind and as a writer you try to get them down on paper. One of the hardest things to do is communicate what’s in your head and get it down on the page. This graphic novel is a reminder of the power of imagery.

4. Brown Girl Dreaming by Jacqueline Woodson

This is an award-winning portrayal of a child looking for her place in the world. We’ve all felt like outsiders, but diversity and diverse representation in literature is something all writers should be working towards in their fiction. Please pick this up.

5. This Is Where I Leave You by Jonathan Tropper

Comedy is not easy to write. In fact, humor might just be the hardest thing to write. Time after time, I see writers who are writing what their idea of funny is, when in fact, we all have a different sense of humor. This Is Where I Leave You is darkly funny and never lets the reader forget that sometimes humor comes from unexpected places.

6. Shakespeare 

Everyone has a favorite play. Mine is Macbeth. It’s one of his easier reads, but I am always very moved by the motivation of the characters. Greed, love, passion, and legacy are universal emotions that never get old and never date themselves. I think Shakespeare is a great way to reconnect with the themes of life that run deep in our DNA.

7. Eleanor and Park by Rainbow Rowell

Writing for teens is not easy. Ask any YA author. What makes this book soar is its ability to remind us what our teen years were like in a honest way that few books can. We can all remember what our high school days felt like, but that’s through the lens of years of healing. Few writers can tap into the true life and death emotions that teens feel about love, life and their futures. This book is a great teacher in knowing your audience.

8. August: Osage County by Tracy Letts

Family drama is my favorite kind of drama. Secrets buried by family members for the sake of their own sanity–this is a hook I can always get behind. I was blown away by this screenplay, which was originally written for the stage. Southern charm, family issues that span generations and learning what stigmas/secrets/ways of living are genetic and what you can leave behind is a lesson that takes decades to learn. This is a beautiful script based on a moving play that you can find in the link above under “2013 Screenplays.”

9. Save The Cat! The Last Book on Screenwriting You’ll Ever Need by Blake Snyder

Writing a novel, is very obviously different than writing a screenplay–that’s easy to see. “Saving the cat” is a metaphor for more than just writing for the screen. Saving the cat is about letting your story and characters reach an all time low, and then bringing them out from the darkness when it seems too bleak. Don’t be afraid to challenge your characters and risk losing the cat–you’ll always find a way to save her.

Q: What unconventional books, plays or stories inspire you?